Archive for November, 2018

  • Kangaroos youngsters face immediate axe

    Date: 2018.11.16 | Category: 南京夜网 | Response: 0

    Young blood: David Klemmer was one of Australia’s better performers despite his callowness Photo: Hagen Hopkins
    Nanjing Night Net

    Young blood: David Klemmer was one of Australia’s better performers despite his callowness Photo: Hagen Hopkins

    Young blood: David Klemmer was one of Australia’s better performers despite his callowness Photo: Hagen Hopkins

    Young blood: David Klemmer was one of Australia’s better performers despite his callowness Photo: Hagen Hopkins

    Australia’s next-generation of stars may be placed on the backburner – for now – with the Kangaroos set to recall their missing veterans following the Four Nations finals loss to New Zealand.

    Eleven players were chosen in the latest Kangaroos squad for the first time, as a host of regular Test players watched on. The likes of Paul Gallen, Billy Slater, Johnathan Thurston and Matt Scott will be rushed  back into the Test side – provided they are fit – for Australia’s one and only international next season against the Kiwis.

    Picking a host of new players, including Sione Mata’utia, Dylan Walker, Josh Jackson, Aaron Woods and David Klemmer, has given Australia a bigger playing pool of blooded talent to pick from and the experience will help the youngsters push for 2017 World Cup selection, with doubts remaining over a host of ageing senior players. Mata’utia, Woods and Klemmer were among the best performers for the Kangaroos and will push for inclusion in a full strength side next year.

    Skipper Cameron Smith said it was a challenge leading the inexperienced squad.

    “No disrespect to the young guys in our team but it would’ve been handy to have a couple more experienced players in the team,” Smith said. “Unfortunately we had a few guys unavailable. I couldn’t fault the effort from the young guys.

    “Most of the guys here haven’t played 100 NRL matches, some of them haven’t played 10. It’s a big step up for them. When I came in as a young fella there might have been three or four of us in a squad of 24. Over the years you’ve had more senior players in the squad to lead the team around.

    “It was a challenge for everyone in the squad to make sure everyone knew what our game plan was and get everyone to gel together.

    “They [rookies] have been involved in this series. If they are playing well this year they are a chance of being [selected] next year.”

    Smith was given the Harry Sunderland Medal as the best Kangaroos player this year. Ron Coote, who won the award in 1974, presented Smith with the medal in the dressing sheds following the Kangaroos loss.

    Smith said his side performed better than their opening round defeat to the Kiwis.

    “I spoke to the boys after the game about how proud I was of their effort,” Smith said. “We lost but the Kiwis had to beat us. It wasn’t like the first game where we didn’t play well. We were testing them right to the end. They had to play well to beat us and credit to them because they did.

    “At times on the field we lacked experience in certain positions. I’m not going to sit here and say we would’ve won with the guys who were experienced in the team because I’m very proud of how the younger guys held themselves.”

    The Kangaroos had called on Immortals Wally Lewis and Andrew Johns to address the side before kick-off. Lewis’ message was about encouraging the players to walk off the field with no regrets as he highlighted personal moments where he still maintained remorse because of his lack of on-field urgency.

    This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

  • Danny Frawley spurns Hawks, will join St Kilda

    Date: 2018.11.16 | Category: 南京夜网 | Response: 0

    St Kilda great Danny Frawley has turned his back on an offer from Hawthorn and will join St Kilda as a part-time coach working with the team’s defenders.
    Nanjing Night Net

    Frawley, 51, will work with the Saints three days a week, having long wanted to play a role at a club where he forged a reputation as one of the finest fullbacks of his era.

    The Saints confirmed Frawley’s appointment in a statement on Monday morning.

    Frawley “will assist the Saints backline coach and use his extensive coaching experience to help advise St Kilda’s tall defenders and forwards as well as the St Kilda coaching staff and the Saints Player Academy”, the statement read.

    It’s believed the Saints feel he can manage this role alongside his radio and television commitments during the AFL season.

    The Hawks had thought Frawley had accepted an offer to be a part-time assistant coach, also working with the defenders. However, the Saints offered more days – it’s understood the Hawks’ role was only for two days.

    While the Hawks announced on Friday Frawley would join the club, Fairfax Media revealed on Sunday he was also considering an offer from the Saints.

    On Monday morning Hawthorn released a statement confirming that they had agreed to release Frawley from his role at the club.

    Frawley played 240 matches for the Saints as a rugged full-back and is also a former club captain. He would later be an assistant coach at Collingwood before accepting the top job at Richmond, a club he guided from 2000 to 2004.

    He stepped down this year as chief executive of the AFL Coaches Association amid a call for change .

    The Hawks will now look for a replacement to work alongside Adem Yze, their new full-time defensive coach.

    This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

  • THE LOWEDOWN: Sluggish Jets a mile off the pace

    Date: 2018.11.16 | Category: 南京夜网 | Response: 0

    THE LOWEDOWN: Sluggish Jets a mile off the pace TOUGH START: A dejected Jeronimo reflects on the Jets’ 4-0 loss to the Roar on Friday night. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers
    Nanjing Night Net

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    TweetFacebook►Middleby pleads for supporters to forgive team

    ►Robert Dillon: Time for FFA to stop the Tinkler rot

    OUCH, that’s got to hurt! Where do you start, trying to explain what happened to the Jets at Hunter Stadium on Friday night against the Brisbane Roar?

    In times of gloom it’s often best to start with humour, and John Kosmina on the Fox Sports couch summed up the Jets’ performance thus: ‘‘Newcastle were lucky to get to zero.’’

    His colleague Andy Harper, perennially the voice of sober reason, considered it the worst performance by a home team in his recollection of the A-League’s 10-year history.

    ‘‘Jets’ gutless show an insult to fans,’’ read the headline in a Sunday newspaper, and that’s probably the harshest criticism any player can face.

    I can’t say that I’ve ever witnessed players go onto a pitch and not try, and I don’t think that was the case on Friday, but the Jets were a mile off the pace, and a clear second best in every department.

    All of which followed a decent performance and unquestioned desire six days earlier against the much-vaunted Melbourne Victory. The stark contrast between the two probably made Friday’s offering all the harder to stomach.

    Why was it so?

    Were the deficiencies in physical, tactical or technical areas? If you answered ‘‘all three’’ and added ‘‘general application’’, you’d get full marks. (If you muttered a glass and a half of full cream dairy milk when I asked why was it so, a chocolate bar will be delivered to your retirement home).

    It’s easy after the fact to criticise tactics and selection gambles, and I think it’s safe to say that captain Kew Jaliens won’t be playing at right back again anytime soon.

    The Dutchman is usually one of the Jets’ best on a week-to-week basis and spoke of the mentality of his team post-match on Friday. He need look no further than his own second-half mystery tour, where he was everywhere on the pitch bar the right back spot he was supposed to be occupying. He won’t let it happen again, I’m sure.

    Tactically, the Jets never came to terms with Thomas Broich playing as a false number nine or centre forward, dropping into midfield and overloading the Jets in that area.

    That left the two Jets central defenders marking nobody. Consequently the Jets midfield was short on numbers and working overtime, but that is not an indictable tactical offence.

    When, however, your back four then gets beaten in behind trying to play offside and can’t recover in time centrally, that’s bordering on criminal and suicidal.

    You don’t have to go back too far to remember games where the Jets absorbed more pressure against stronger Brisbane sides and pulled off unlikely victories. That, despite an insipid first 45 minutes, was still on the cards at half-time.

    Let’s be honest, we have all just finished praising the Wanderers for winning the ACL with less of a foothold in the contest than the Jets had at the interval on Friday.

    What the Wanderers had was unwavering discipline and a physical tenacity that was markedly missing for the Jets. We will try to work that out in a moment.

    Before anyone sends around the men in white coats, no, I’m not trying to sell you the impression that the first half was satisfactory from a ‘‘playing’’ point of view, but at 0-0 the game was not lost.

    A former teammate suggested ‘‘he has to go to a 4-4-2’’, and when they came out for the second half that had happened, with Joel Griffiths joining Edson Montano up front.

    My main gripe was that the Jets had allowed Brisbane to hem them in their own half and had made no conscious attempt to turn around the Roar back four, sat perched a metre from the halfway line.

    That’s a little like a fast bowler allowing a batsman to stand two metres out of his crease and smash half volleys back past him.

    Granted, the Jets didn’t have electric pace available to make that possible on a regular basis, but the 4-4-2 meant that was more of an option, just to keep the Roar back four honest.

    I’m not here to offer excuses for the Jets, and to be fair coach Phil Stubbins didn’t choose to hide behind any. But why, I thought, the difference in level of performance in six days?

    It looked from an athletic perspective that the Jets had run sandhills the day prior to the match. I’m sure that’s not the case.

    Could it have been the sum of all their travelling, followed by a big effort against the Victory on a pitch visiting coach Kevin Muscat reflected ‘‘left of lot of my players sore and tired’’?

    When the Victory came out and dominated Sydney FC in the first half at Allianz Stadium on Saturday night, that theory seemed decidedly less feasible.

    Has Stubbins’ attempts to bring ‘‘more football’’ to his midfield left the Jets more vulnerable at the defensive end? It’s an admirable ideology, but the Jets have looked most secure defensively when Jacob Pepper and Taylor Regan played ostensibly to break up opposition attacks in front of the back four, with Griffiths as a running type No.10.

    To be fair, Ben Kantarovski has done a decent job since his return in that area, and Billy Celeski showed glimpses of his quality on Friday night and will get better with game time.

    However, the two times Stubbins has tried to get tactically aggressive, his side has been opened up defensively.

    Therein lies the ‘‘Catch 22’’. Does he bunker down and accept the physical and technical limitations of his squad, or take chances to improve the fluency and threat they can achieve?

    Everybody has had bad days, been on the end of embarrassing scorelines, and to deny it is folly. The concern is it all happened a little to easily on Friday night.

    That can be traced back further than this week, or this season, in my view. You reap what you sow in football, and the Jets have allowed – or encouraged, forcibly in some cases – three captains and a potential captain to leave the club in the past four seasons.

    One got ‘‘too old’’, two perhaps became less fashionable, or were deemed to be earning more than they were worth.

    Those three midfielders all had a bit of an edge, a bit of warrior in them, that sometimes we underestimate. I know that each of them would have made the excellent Luke Brattan think twice before lighting up his second cigar in central midfield on Friday night.

    They would also have had a real whinge to the coach, and the back four, if they felt someone was doing it easy while their area was being overrun, and it would have been sorted, at least to some extent, on the pitch.

    The other ‘‘potential’’ captain looked like being the best left stopper in the competition and he has blossomed into that, leadership duties and warrior-like mentality being added bonuses.

    Meanwhile, the revolving door at the Jets continues to work overtime as we ring in multiple changes season by season.

    I didn’t envy Phil Stubbins’ task when he was appointed, and it’s certainly assumed even less appeal since the weekend.

    He will probably be asking himself the ‘‘where do I start’’ question right now, and he could do worse than follow the lead of Sydney FC coach Graham Arnold.

    True, Arnold had more resources available, some bigger names on his roster, but his primary concern has been to make sure the defence is right and they are hard to beat.

    They have played some good stuff, scrapped when they have to, and with four consecutive clean sheets are close to the top of the table.

    Sounds simple, I know, and is harder to implement, but if you want to build something reliable you have to have a solid foundation.

  • Middleby pleads for supportersto forgive team

    Date: 2018.11.16 | Category: 南京夜网 | Response: 0

    Middleby pleads for supporters to forgive team Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS
    Nanjing Night Net

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    Scenes from the Newcastle Jets v Brisbane Roar game at Hunter Stadium on Friday night. Pic by MAX MASON-HUBERS

    TweetFacebook► David Lowe: Sluggish Jets a mile off the pace

    ►Robert Dillon: Time for FFA to stop the Tinkler rot

    JETS chief executive Robbie Middleby hopes fans will give Newcastle’s players and coach Phil Stubbins a chance to redeem themselves but admits that ‘‘actions speak louder than words’’.

    Friday night’s 4-0 trouncing from Brisbane at Hunter Stadium, which left the Jets without a win after six games, has prompted a predictably hostile reaction from frustrated followers, many of whom have labelled it the worst performance in the club’s history.

    Middleby said fans were entitled to their opinions and everyone at the club was ‘‘apologetic’’ for producing such a lacklustre effort on home turf. But he called on the Novocastrian faithful to ‘‘stick by us’’ and was confident of a vastly improved performance against Western Sydney Wanderers at Parramatta Stadium on Saturday.

    ‘‘I know it’s been tough so far, but we need their support,’’ Middleby told the Newcastle Herald.

    ‘‘We need the support from everyone. The players, the staff, we’re all hurting, because we feel like we let everyone down on Friday night.

    ‘‘But we need their support if we’re going to thrive.’’

    Brisbane coach Mike Mulvey expressed similar sentiments at the post-match press conference on Friday when he was asked about Newcastle fans booing their team off the pitch.

    ‘‘We’ve played four games and we’ve lost three at home, but our fans have been more patient,’’ Mulvey said.

    ‘‘That comes from having a level of success over the years, which Newcastle hasn’t enjoyed.

    ‘‘It’s time now for them to back their players, back their manager. That’s the only way you can achieve anything in this game, if everybody sticks together,’’ Mulvey said.

    Middleby was disappointed that Stubbins, who is six games into a two-year tenure, was already attracting scrutiny over his future.

    ‘‘It’s early in the season,’’ Middleby said.

    ‘‘We’ve got faith in Phil and the players that that performance will not be a regular thing.

    ‘‘To me, I don’t see why we should be commenting on job security … it’s six games into the season.

    ‘‘We’ve had a tough run but Phil’s our coach.

    ‘‘He’s got a new team, a lot of players who have been in and out, but Phil is our coach.

    ‘‘And we’ve got faith that Phil and the players will turn this around. All of us, collectively.’’

    Middleby said Saturday’s clash with Asian champions Western Sydney, who occupy the bottom rung on the A-League ladder but have two games in hand on second-last Newcastle, would be ‘‘another very, very tough game’’ but he backed the Jets to show their true colours.

    ‘‘We need to come out and make amends with our performance,’’ he said. ‘‘Actions speak louder than words.

    ‘‘But I’m confident that there are certain types of characters in the club who will respond the right way to this.

    ‘‘That’s why I’m certain the performance will be better this week.’’

    A shellshocked Stubbins said he had to ‘‘take responsibility’’ for the performance, admitting he was ‘‘embarrassed’’ by the home crowd’s reaction.

    ‘‘All I can say to the fans is we’ll be doing everything we can to make amends,’’ Stubbins said. ‘‘The quality is one thing. Effort, endeavour and approach and your mindset and mentality is another … we need to set some standards in place that are akin to a team that does have a crack.’’

  • Cup winners line up with new contender

    Date: 2018.11.16 | Category: 南京夜网 | Response: 0

    CENTRE OF ATTENTION: Protectionist parades at Broadmeadow on Sunday. Picture: Max Mason-HubersMELBOURNE Cup-winning trainer Andreas Wohler could be set for a return to Flemington next November with another German import owned by Newcastle syndicators Australian Bloodstock.
    Nanjing Night Net

    Singspiel entire Singing was set to join the Kris Lees team for the spring but was injured after running second to Melbourne Cup winner Protectionist in a group2 over 2414metres at Hamburg in June.

    It put on hold plans for Singing to travel to Australia and he has joined Wohler for next year in an effort to get him back racing.

    ‘‘He is qualified for both the cups already and we are just going to take him along slowly and see if Andreas can get him back in form,’’ Australian Bloodstock’s Jamie Lovett said.

    ‘‘It is similar to what happened with Protectionist this year – we had to be happy that he was back before committing to coming out here. It will be the same with Singing. He needs to win a couple of races to be assured of a start in the big races. If he does he will be here next spring. There are no guarantees in racing, though.’’

    Singing had been set for the Caulfield Cup after running group3 placings over 2400m at Longchamp and 2000m at Saint Cloud earlier in the year, before being runner-up to Protectionist under Wohler’s care.

    He is lightly raced, like Protectionist, winning three of his 12 starts,and has been around the money at black-type level, including a three-length fourth to Flintshire in the group1 Juddmonte Grand Prix over 2400m at Longchamp in June 2013.

    ‘‘He is a serious horse and if he didn’t get injured he would have been right in the Caulfield Cup this year,’’ Lovett said.

    Lees had planned to be in England for the quarantine period for Singing in August until the injury.

    ‘‘He is a nice horse and it was very unfortunate that he had the problems and we didn’t get to see him out here,’’ Lees said.

    There is some consolation for the Newcastle trainer, as he will prepare Protectionist for the autumn. The Melbourne Cup winner was on parade, along with his ‘‘Loving Cup’’, at the Newcastle Jockey Club meeting on Sunday.

    ‘‘I can’t believe how many people have turned up here to the races,’’ Lovett said. ‘‘It is amazing what happens with a Melbourne Cup, it just seems to attract people. I have to say it is overwhelming to see what it means.’’

    AAP reports: While many lament the lack of home-grown stayers in Australia, Simon O’Donnell makes no apologies for buying northern hemisphere horses to race here.

    O’Donnell and his partner Terry Henderson run OTI Racing, which sources distance horses from Europe, including Saturday’s Sandown stakes winners Renew and Au Revoir.

    Both will remain in Australia, with Zipping Classic winner Au Revoir to be transferred from French trainer Andre Fabre to Peter Moody.

    ‘‘You don’t need a lot more evidence to say the overseas stayers are better than the southern hemisphere stayers,’’ O’Donnell said.

    ‘‘While the product has to be sourced somewhere else that’s where we’ll go.’’