• Police on the scrapheap

    Date: 2019.05.17 | Category: 南京夜网 | Tags:

    Thousands of uniformed police officers rallied outside NSW Parliament in Sydney in November 2011 to protest against the government’s plans to slash compensation payments to officers who are injured or disabled in the line of duty.
    Nanjing Night Net

    The officers were furious with proposed changes to the police death and disability scheme, which would restrict some compensation payouts and place a greater emphasis on rehabilitating injured officers back to work.

    Mike Gallacher, who was police minister at the time, said spiralling costs of the death and disability scheme were unsustainable and had delivered lump-sum payments of more than $400,000, which had discouraged officers from returning to work. He said the government’s priority was to get injured police officers working again.

    When the insurance scheme was overhauled in 2012, the government awarded the contract previously held by MetLife to another insurer called TAL. There are more than 230 injured police still waiting to have claims settled by MetLife.

    The NSW Auditor General found that injured officers had cost the NSW Police Force more than $110 million in 2006–07. In 2011–12 the scheme cost $260 million, more than 10 times what was anticipated in 2005.

    In a report released earlier this year, the Auditor General said up to 526 police officers a year were receiving large lump sum benefits and medical discharge following long-term sick leave under the old scheme.

    Since the introduction of the new scheme, the number of medical discharges have fallen dramatically under a policy to return injured officers to duty as soon as possible.

    The Auditor General reported the new scheme had reduced the length of time injured officers are on benefits. It has also decreased costly claims for psychological injuries and the number of injured officers returning to work on rehabilitation. This had been achieved through reducing the incentive to claim a lump sum and leave the police force.

    Metlife has said that in the last 12 months it had considerably boosted its dedicated assessment team and reduced the number of cases significantly.

    The new government insurer, TAL, said it recognised the complexity of some claims and was working with all stakeholders to finalise claims as quickly as possible.

    This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.